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How to Make Easy Peel Hard Boiled Eggs


This step-by-step photo tutorial will show you exactly how to make Easy Peel Hard Boiled Eggs! No more stuck-on shells or overcooked yolks. This foolproof method for making easy peel boiled eggs will become your go-to way to cook eggs every time.

How to make easy peel hard boiled eggs every time

Not many people enjoy the challenge of peeling the shell off a stubborn hard boiled egg. You know when the shell sticks like crazy and takes half of the egg with it? Yeah, no thanks! Today is the day that we share the method we have used for years to make the perfect hard boiled eggs that are easy to peel.

Hard boiled eggs are something we make often to have on hand. They’re an easy and low-cost, protein-rich food that you can eat simply with a dash of salt and pepper (maybe a little hot sauce) or add on top of a salad for a boost of protein.

Photo of brown eggs on a small cream colored plate. Blog Post: How to make Easy-Peel Hard Boiled Eggs

A step-by-step photo tutorial for making easy peel hard boiled eggs

The method that we share here works well for both farm-fresh eggs and store-purchased eggs. The key to easy peel eggs is to bring the water to a boil first, then add the eggs. After boiling, transfer the eggs to an ice bath which is where the magic happens.

No, they don’t peel themselves, BUT the shells do come off incredibly easy now! Plus, when you follow the boiling time we suggest, you won’t get that greenish-bluish colored sulfur ring around the yolk, a sign of overcooking. Hallelujah!

Start with 6 to 12 organic large eggs. This amount of eggs we cook varies, depending on whether we’re making them for snacks or planning to use them in a recipe. This method will work for any range of eggs from 6 to a dozen.

Overhead photo of everything that's needed for the How to Make Easy Peel-Hard Boiled Eggs including a 2 quart saucepan, a slotted spoon, a clear bowl and a small plate of brown eggs.

What you’ll need to make easy peel boiled eggs

  • Whole eggs – we prefer to use organic or local, farm fresh. Read our post on How to Choose Quality Eggs
  • Pot – we use a 2 quart saucepan
  • Medium bowl – for the ice water
  • Slotted spoon – to lift the eggs in and out of the boiling water
  • Water – for boiling the eggs
  • Ice – for plunging the eggs into after they have been cooked

Photo of eggs being transferred with a slotted spoon to the pot of boiled water. Blog post: Photo of brown eggs on a small cream colored plate. Blog Post: How to make Easy-Peel Hard Boiled Eggs

Step 1: Fill a pot with water, about  3/4 full, and bring the water to a boil.

Step 2: Once water is boiling, carefully slip the eggs, one at a time, into the boiling water with a slotted spoon.

Step 3: Keep the water at a gentle boil (not rigorous). Set a timer for 12 minutes. If you want softer boiled eggs, set a timer for 10 minutes.

Photo of egg sitting in an ice bath in the clear bowl, after they have been boiled. Blog Post: Photo of brown eggs on a small cream colored plate. Blog Post: How to make Easy-Peel Hard Boiled Eggs

Step 4: While eggs are boiling, fill a medium bowl with ice and water to make an ice bath.

Step 5: When the boiling time is up, use the slotted spoon to immediately transfer the hard-boiled eggs to the ice bath. Let the eggs sit in the ice bath for 10 minutes.

Photo of Easy-Peel Hard Boiled Eggs on a small plate. Some of the brown eggs are in the shell, and two are peeled with shell lying next to them..

Step 6: Once the 10 minutes is up, the eggs are cool enough to handle and ready for easy peeling.

Step 7: Store the peeled or unpeeled eggs in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.

Photo of a easy-peel hard boiled eggs on a plate. Some of the eggs with shells on and some with out. One of the eggs is being removed from the shell. Photo shows hand easily removing the egg from the shell.

How long do hard boiled eggs last in the refrigerator? 

Hard boiled eggs that are stored in an airtight container will last for one week in the refrigerator, peeled or unpeeled. Make a batch of easy peel boiled eggs as part of your weekend meal prep, and you’ll be thankful that you did all week long.

Prepared recipes that are made with hard boiled eggs, such as a salad, can be safely stored in the refrigerator for for 3 to 4 days.

Tips to make easy peel hard boiled eggs at high altitude

Some members of our team live in Colorado, at elevation about 5,500 feet, so we know a thing or two about how to hard boil eggs at high altitude. Use our foolproof method and simply increase the boiling time by 10%-15%. So, if you want your yolks fully cooked, boil the eggs for 13 1/2 minutes (which is 12 minutes + 10% to 15%).

Overhead photo of Easy-Peel Hard Boiled Eggs on a small, cream colored plate. Four of the eggs with shells on next to four hard boiled egg halves showing yolks.

Recipes that use hard boiled eggs

Check out some of our insanely delicious recipes where these easy peel hard boiled eggs will come in handy:

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Let’s Get Cookin’

How to Make Easy Peel Boiled Eggs

Never struggle with peeling a hard boiled egg again. This step-by-step photo tutorial will show you exactly how to make easy peel hard boiled eggs every time.

  • Author: Stacie Hassing
  • Prep Time: 5 min
  • Cook Time: 12 min
  • Total Time: 17 minutes
  • Yield: 1 dozen hard-cooked eggs 1x
  • Category: How-to

Ingredients

  • 6 to 12 whole eggs
  • Water
  • Ice

Instructions

  1. Fill a pot (such as a 2-quart saucepan) about 3/4 full with water. Place the pot over medium-high heat and bring the water to a rolling boil.
  2. After the water has come to a boil, use a slotted spoon to gently slip the eggs, one at a time, into the boiling water.
  3. Keep the water at a gentle, rolling boil, not vigorous (a vigorous boil will increase chances of the eggs cracking). Adjust the heat as necessary.
  4. Set a timer for 12 minutes to make hard-cooked yolks. If you prefer softer-cooked yolks, set a timer for 10 minutes.
  5. While eggs are boiling, make an ice bath by filling a medium bowl half way with ice and adding water.
  6. Once the boiling time is up, use the slotted spoon to immediately transfer the eggs from the boiling water to the ice bath. Let the eggs sit in ice water for 10 minutes.
  7. After the 10 minutes, the eggs will be cool enough to handle and are ready to be peeled.

Notes

A 2-quart pot works great for boiling up to 12 eggs.

Hard boiled eggs will last for one week in the refrigerator, peeled or unpeeled, when stored in an airtight container.

If cooking hard boiled eggs at altitude, we recommend increasing the boiling time by 10%-15%.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 whole hard boiled egg
  • Calories: 70
  • Sugar: 0 g
  • Sodium: 70 mg
  • Fat: 5 g
  • Saturated Fat: 2 g
  • Carbohydrates: 0 g
  • Fiber: 0 g
  • Protein: 6 g
  • Cholesterol: 207 mg

Pin It Now, Make Them Later!


All photos and content are copyright protected. Please do not use our photos without prior written permission. If you wish to republish this recipe, please rewrite the recipe in your own unique words and link back to the source recipe here on The Real Food Dietitians. Thank you!

About Stacie Hassing

Stacie is a Licensed and Registered Dietitian from rural southern Minnesota where she, her husband and daughter reside with their two pups. She’s a co-founder of The Real Food RDs and content creator of simple and wholesome recipes. She loves all kinds of fitness and has a passion to inspire as many as she can live a healthier and happier life both in and out of the kitchen – the driving force behind the co-development of the The Real Food RDs brand.





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